What Doesn’t Work On Twitter: Unappealing Images

Images can convince people to click a link or it can convince them not to.

Here’s a recent example of a tweet with an unappealing image and how you can avoid the same mistake for your small business:

sierra-trading-post

Design images that are properly sized and cropped for Twitter’s timeline.

Take the extra few seconds to think about Twitter’s size limitations when designing images. If you don’t, you could end up creating a compelling reason to NOT react to your content.

Pick images that communicate what your product or resource is ultimately for.

Everything your business does online, even your tweets, should have a direct link to why you ultimately exist. People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it. Don’t fool yourself into thinking that your tweets don’t have the power to communicate your “why.”

The image Amanda picked for this tweet is a very poor visual for the content accompanying it, which is a blog post all about replacing winter clothes that have been outgrown. On Twitter’s timeline, the image is cropped in a way that cuts off the verbiage at the top and focuses your attention only on the pant thighs. When you click to enlarge the image, it’s just more of an unflattering visual with no compelling reason to click any further. Amanda would have been better off taking a funny picture of her kids being distraught about the clothes they had obviously outgrown. That would have been a much more compelling answer to the question, “What is it for?

Include faces to boost your CTR.

We, humans, have specific cells in our brains that respond to human faces. The people in our lives that are most important to us might even have a cell designated to recognize only their face. This means our brain is always on the look for faces and it alerts us when one comes into view. Use this information in your image selections by including faces as often as possible.

10 more ideas based in science.

One of my favorite articles on the human response to imagery is by Andrew Tate: “10 Scientific Reasons People Are Wired to Respond to Your Visual Marketing.”

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